The Art of the Book '93 - Essay: Binding/Essai: La Reliure








A juried exhibition of the work of members celebrating the tenth anniversary of the Canadian Bookbinders and Book Artists Guild/Une exposition-concours des oeuvres par les membres en célébration du dixème anniversaire de la Guilde Canadienne des relieurs et des artistes du livre.






BINDING: One of the first Canadian book arts

Diana Patterson

Ernest Cormier's binding, c. 1938, of 30 Arpents by Ringuet. The long lots appear in the upper right, with farmhouses near the road that runs along the coast of the St. Lawrence River, in the lower left. See Unique or Limited Edition Bindings. / Reliure d'Ernest Cormier aux environs de 1938, des Trente arpents de Ringuet. Les fermes en long se trouvent dans Ie coin superieur droit, et les maisons de ferme près de la route qui coure Ie long de la côte du fleuve Saint-Laurent dans le coin inférieur gauche. Voir les reliures d'éditions uniques au limiteés.

________________________________________________


BINDING HAS BEEN DONE, in what is now Canada, since the 17th century. Names of binders, however, are not recorded until the late 18th century, and not until the mid-19th century do we have any count of binders: the 1851 census lists 51 bookbinders in Upper Canada (now Ontario), and 40 in Lower Canada (now Quêbec).


Before about 1820, books were generally bound in small quantities, or to order, mostly in leather. Any decoration would be done by hand after the book was bound. Handcrafted binding, and the design bindings displayed in this exhibition, are still done this way. After 1820 publishers began regularly to bind the entire edition of a book when it was printed, with the designs printed on paper, or stamped into cloth or leather. The decoration was done mostly by machine, and more and more of the actual sewing and making of covers began to be automated. By 1851 binding would have been considerably automated, particularly the design that was imprinted and impressed in the fabric or paper.


What were these first bindings like? It is often difficult to know. We can only assume that we have an example of early Canadian binding on a book printed in Canada, for there is usually no way to know if a book printed in Paris was, in fact, bound in Montreal, for instance. From the evidence available, Canadian bindings show a level of workmanship that is competent, but not extraordinary, and the designs were mainly copied from those of inexpensive books from England and France. The first bindings that are obviously Canadian in appearance seem to have been the edition bindings of directories, statutes, and almanacs from the 19th century, with beavers and maple leaves on the covers.


English publishers began sending books with distinctively Canadian designs, incorporating such features as maple leaves, beavers, and Indians, to make their books, especially children's books and text books, look as if they were made in Canada, when, in fact, they were printed and bound in London. The imitation "Canadian" bindings continued well into the 20th century. The Chronicles of Canada (32 volumes), first published in 1915 in Glasgow, had thin, purple, leather covers, stamped with the Canadian seal surrounded by the words "Chronicles of Canada." Only a decade later the same book appeared in red cloth, published by Glasgow, Brook and Company, and printed by Hunter-Rose in Toronto. A very Similar, but not identical, stamp appears on each cover. One may assume that the first edition was bound, as well as printed, in Scotland, and the second in Canada.


Some portion of the work done by Canadian binders, though how much is not known, was to bind books that had been imported in sheets from England, France, or the United States. The sheets of printed paper, without cardboard, leather, cloth, and thread, were lighter and easier to pack, and kept shipping costs down. The books would then be bound before Canadian sales began.


An important, although relatively modern, instance is carefully documented because it involved a court case. In 1936, Margaret Mitchell's novel Gone with the Wind was printed in the United States, and sheets were sent to Canada for binding and Canadian promotion. Owing to complications of international copyright, which were taken to the High Court of Justice in the Hague, it was argued, that books were considered published in Canada if the book was bound in Canada, and promoted from Canada. It was the opinion of the court that publishing included printing, but Macmillan of Canada showed that the binding of sheets printed elsewhere was a common practice in Canada.


One of the earliest publishers to print and bind Canadian books with attractive bindings using Canadian designs, was William Briggs of Toronto, which flourished from 1880 to the end of the First World War, when it became The Ryerson Press. The Briggs edition bindings are pictorial, handsome, and certainly Canadian. In 1925, Graphic Publishers of Ottawa took up the idea of Canadian designs where Briggs left off. Graphic Publishers and its subsidiaries, Ru-Mi-Lou and Ariston, made books with Canadian words, illustrations, bindings, endpapers, and dust jackets that do considerable honour to the designers, such as Thoreau MacDonald. Who actually bound either Briggs or Graphics Publishers books is not documented. Alas, Graphic Publishers went bankrupt in 1932 as part of The Great Depression.


Canadian binders have a long tradition binding millions of books, both domestic and foreign, and yet they are only just beginning to be recognized. Part of the reason lies in the traditional anonymity of the craft: edition binding was an adjunct to the whole process of publishing, and only the publisher was ordinarily named. The extent of their binding can hardly be known, owing to that provincial notion, common to many countries in the English and French empires, that to stand out as a local product would bring derision.


The art of hand binding returned in England at the end of the 19th century. Design bindings were made for a very small, limited edition of a work; or a distinctive binding might be done of a single copy. In Canada there were few rich collectors to desire such workmanship. It has not been until the mid- to late-20th century that the artistic design of binding has caught the imagination of Canadian book buyers.


Certainly one of the earliest design binders in Canada was Thomas C. Lynton of Ottawa, binder to the Parliamentary Library. The example of his work illustrated in The Bookbinding Trades Journal of 1914 is of Thomas Moore's Irish Melodies "bound in brown levant with inlaid harp in green and gold[;] the border is inlaid in scarlet, and the inner frame presents a very pleasing effect on a blue ground." If Lynton created "Canadian" designs, and if some survived the great fire of 1916, they are not, to my knowledge, documented.



Thoreau MacDonald's design, executed by Warwick Bros. & Rutter Limited, Toronto, 1925. Geese, pines, fish, and elk horns indicate a mid-night sun where the stars still shine. See Unique or Limited Edition Bindings. / Conçu par Thoreau MacDonald, exécuté par Warwick Bros. & Rutter Limited, Toronto, 1925. Des oies, des pins, des poissons et des comes d'orignal montrent un soleil au milieu de la nuit alors que les étoiles brillent encore. Voir les reliures d'édition: uniques ou limitées.

______________________________________________________


A more original design binder, who bound several books for himself, in original designs that are still avant garde in their appeal. His binding for Ringuet's 30 Arpents (1938) shows the St. Lawrence River flowing diagonally across the cover, with the traditional Québecois long lots, with the farm houses placed near the river's edge. Cormier was trained in France, and his binding is in the French tradition, despite its distinctively Canadian subject.


Cormier neither had customers for his bindings, nor students to study his goals of design in bindings, as this was only one of his many interests in design. The design binders who later arose in Canada came from England, France, Germany, or elsewhere, bringing their training and, at least initially, their traditional subjects. Even now much design binding is an adjunct to editions that have been specially printed; the emphasis is on printing, and paper, relegating binding to a box to hold loose sheets.


Binders are still mainly nameless in Canada, and only recently have bibliographers begun to describe individual copies rather than ideal copies of printed books. With the documentation of individual copies can come more complete description of bindings, especially design bindings. We can hope that more work on the history of binding will be done to give the fine binders now competing in Canada a sense of their past. While by rights Canada should have nearly four hundred years of tradition in book binding, a tradition has, in fact, only just begun. By bringing the art and profession of binding into a public forum where the binders can see each other's work, and where the public can see binding as an art form, a sense of tradition can become established. As you turn the pages in the catalogue that follows you will see examples that are making history in Canadian book arts, including one of Canada's oldest art forms, binding.


Some books of special interest:


EDITION BINDINGS:


Clark, Duncan. The Two Decanters: Written for His Wife by Duncan Clark. Ed. M.[ary] C.[oad] Craig. Ottawa: Graphic Publishers Ltd., 1930.401 p., 19 cm. Black and silver binding with matching dust jacket, illustrating the decanters under a spotlight.


Fraser, John. A Tale of the Sea and Other Poems, by John Fraser, (Cousin Sandy). Illustrated by O.R. Jacobi, H. Sandham, A. Vogt, W.L. Fraser, of the Society of Canadian Artists. Montreal: Dawson Brothers. MDCCCLXX [1870]. 87 p., ill., 21 cm. John Lovell, Printer. [The verso of the title page reads:] "Entered according to Act of the Parliament of Canada in the year one thousand eight hundred and seventy, by John Fraser, in the Office of the Minister of Agriculture." Bevelled green boards. Blind stamped on back, gold blocked on front. Gilt edges on all sides. Very bright, plain-yellow end papers.


Fraser, W.A. Mooswa and Others of the Boundaries. Illustrated by Arthur Heming. Toronto: William Briggs, MDCCCC. [The verso of the title page reads:] "Entered according to Act of the Parliament of Canada, in the year one thousand nine hundred, by William Briggs, at the Department of Agriculture, Ottawa." No bevelling. Plain white end papers, gold block & print on front & spine; back blank. Gilt edges on head only.


Grant, George Monro. Picturesque Canada. Toronto: Art Publishing Company, vol. I; Beldon Bros. Vol. II, IS?? 880 p., 500 illus., 33 cm. Canadian Binder Barber Ellis. Silk doublure, onlays, bevelled boards. For the complicated publishing history of this book see Parker, pp. 199-200.


Groves, Edith Lelean. The Kingdom of Childhood with Decorations by Maude Maclaren. Toronto: Warwick Bros. & Rutter, Limited, 1925. 106 p., ilL, 20 ern. The end papers match the dust jacket. Top edge straight cut; no gilding; foreedge & tail edge rough cut.


Maclean, J. Flora. True Anecdotes of Pet Animals belonging to our Household for The Christmas Fireside. Toronto: Printed by C. Blackett Robinson, 5 Jordan Street, 1882. Red-grained cloth, blocked in black & gold. Blind stamped on back. Bevelled boards. All edges gilt. 


Manitoba Pictorial and Biographical De Luxe Supplement. Winnipeg, Vancouver, Montreal: The S.J. Clarke Publishing Co., 1913. 2 vols. large quarto. This work seems to be related to British Columbia Pictorial and Biographical. All are half-bound in truly generous proportions with unusual, decorated paper (modern, with oriental look) with matched end papers, and interior cloth hinge. But the Manitoba volumes have a heavy indenting & gold tooling where leather corner & spine meet the paper. Brown, grained morocco; paper greeny-yellow, black, green & red. British Columbia volumes are dated 1914, so less care taken later, but the same paper & skin were used.


Mowat, Grace Helen. Funny Fables of Fundy and other poems for Children. Written and Illustrated by Grace Helen Mowat. Ottawa: Ru-Mi-Lou Books, 1928. "Produced entirely in the Dominion of Canada." Set in Monotype No. 38E Goudy; set up, printed, and bound in Ottawa, by Ru-Mi-Lou Books. Paper is antique India Book manufactured by Provincial Paper Mills at Mille Roche, Ontario. Binding is grey printed bookcloth blocked in green.


Osborne, Marian. Flight Commander Stork and other Verses. With Illustrations by E.A. Kerr. Toronto: The Macmillan Company of Canada Limited, 1925. 1 vol., ill. (some col.), 23 cm. Printed in Canada at the press of The Hunter-Rose Company Limited. Coarse linen-style red cloth with bold blocking. Endpapers have an illustration by E.A. Kerr.


Peterson, C.[harles]W.[alter], 1868-1944. The Fruits of the Earth: a Story of the Canadian Prairies. Ottawa: Ru-Mi-Lou Books, 1928.304 p. ill. 20 cm. Dust jacket showing a farmer admiring a nude young woman (=Mother Earth?) rising out of his wheat field, before a rising sun with a maple leaf in it. End papers in the style of Plains Indian bead or porcupine quill work. A blue cloth binding with gold tooling.


Wallis, Ella Bell. The Exquisite Gift. Ottawa: Ariston Publishers Ltd., 1930. 249 p., 19 cm. There are both hard-cover and paper-back editions, with dust jacket or paper cover design by Thoreau MacDonald with lone-pine design.


Walters, Reginald Eyre. British Columbia: a Centennial Anthology. Toronto: McClelland & Stewart, 1958. Lovely dust jacket; end papers, with a map of British Columbia on them. Blue cloth binding stamped with a Pacific Northwest Indian Symbol on the boards, in black and gold. The spine is gold-stamped black with an elaborate flourish. Different end paper at back.


UNIQUE OR LIMITED EDITION BINDINGS:

From Collection Centre Canadien d' Architecture/Canadian Centre for Architecture, Montreal:


Ringuet, 1895-1960. 30 arpents: roman. Paris: Flammarion, 1938.292 p., 18.7 x 13 cm. ID 90-B1433 CORM 26 CAGE. "Il a été tiré de cet ouvrage: quatre-vingts exemplaires sur papier alfa numérotés de 1 à 80. Il a été tiré en outre: deux cent-vingt exemplaires sur papier alfa réservés aux selections Lardanchet numérotés de 81 à 300." Library copy 1: no. 3. Ringuet is the pseudonym of Philippe Panneton. French full-leather binding by Ernest Cormier in brown, English morocco with blind stamping and gold tooling on upper and lower covers, marbled endpapers, and marbled head. Original paper covers bound in. Author's autographed presentation copy to Ernest Cormier, in ms., on half-title: à Ernest Cormier, à qui rien d'artistique n'est étranger, avec mon amicale estime ... et [?]ion, Ringuet, 25

décembre 1938.


From The Canadiana Collection, Boys' and Girls' House of the Toronto Public Library:


Snip per, Nancy. Winter is Here. NP: Snipper Books, n.d. 10 p., approx. 30 cm. "One of ten." [shelf mark:] Canadian poetry Snipper. The book is in the shape of a Christmas tree-like spruce. The inner leaves are 1/8" plywood, the outer boards are 1/2" walnut, and these are laced together with leather thongs. There is no further information about Nancy Snipper or the location of Snipper books.


From the Evelyn de Mille Collection at the University of Calgary, MacKimmie Evelyn de Mille Collection at the University of Calgary, MacKimmie Library:


Bringhurst, Robert, 1946- / Lambert, Lucie, 1947-. Conversations with a Toad: text, Robert Bringhurst; images, Lucie Lambert. Vancouver: Editions Lucie Lambert, 1987. [24] p., ill., 35 cm. PS 8552 R54 C66 1987. Special Collections. Copy 28 of 55. Printed on double leaves, in the traditional oriental format, with leaves joined end to end and folded accordion style. The binding was designed and executed by Pierre Ouvrard at Saint-Paul de l'Ile-aux-Noix, Québec. The typographical design and hand-setting of type, and printing by Crispin Elsted, in Jan van Krimpen's Romulus roman and sloped roman, printed on Kizuki hosho, using an 1850 super royal Albion hand press at Barbarian Press, Mission, British Columbia.


Duciaume, Jean Marcel/Gravel, Francine, 1944-. Et le verbe s'est fait chair: poèmes [par] Jean Marcel Duciaume. Gravures [par] Francine Gravel [Edmonton]: Éditions de l'églantier, 1975. [82]p. in bi-fold sheets (in case) illus. 29.5 x 26 cm. PS .955 4 U2 95E8 1 975 Special Collections. No. 7 of 25 copies. Half-bound box in tan calf and a dyed and textured (artificially) cloth in brown, tan, and drab. Closure is leather tab with wooden pin. Printed in brown ink. Bound by the artist. Engraving on doublure framed by a woven, stiffened cloth.


From the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library, University of Toronto:


Dunlap, David A. Shahwandahgooze Days by David A. Dunlap "Sip-Him-Dew-Dave." Privately Published, 1925. illus. by Thoreau MacDonald, made and bound by Warwick Bros. & Rutter Limited, Toronto. The gold-tooled cover design is obviously one of MacDonald's. The title page is also a woodblock of a different design by MacDonald.


Holme, Charles, ed. The Art of the Book: A Review of Some Recent European and American Work in Typography, Page Decoration & Binding. London, Paris, New York: "The Studio" Ltd. MCMXIV [1914]. Morocco leather binding with art-nouveau design gold-tooled as a frame on upper board. Note in this copy: "To University of Toronto[:] This book is from the Library of the late E.J. Hathaway, one-time chairman of 'Toronto Public Library Board.' It is a specimen of fine craftsmanship being bound and hand tooled under his direction by Warwick Bros. & Rutter of which firm he was a Director. Presented by Maud (Snarr) Hathaway (Mrs. E.J.)"


From the Glenbow Foundation Library:


de Smet, Father P.J., S.J. Oregon Missions and Travels over the Rocky Mountains in 1845 46, New York: Edward Dunigan, 1847. 979.5 S6380 A Glenbow binding with marbled end papers. Bound c. 1960 or 67.


Jacobsen-McGill. Arctic Research Expedition to Axel Heberg Island Queen Elizabeth Island: Preliminary Report 1959-1960. Montreal: McGill, June, 1961. 998 J17j. A printed t.p. But the rest is a typescript with half-tones, maps & some set charts.Bound in white-grained leather with red onlays. Red is elaborately tooled in gold, endpapers separated by leather joints are red fantasy-decorated papers with gold speckles. Slip case is similar to binding without tooling.


Ross, Alexander. The Fur Hunters of the Far West: A Narrative of Adventures in the Oregon and Rocky Mountains. Vol. II only. London: Smith, Elder & Co., 1855. 979.5 R823f. A design binding done c. 1963 by Glenbow foundation. Gold calf, with much gold tooling.


Bibliography


Andrews, Susan. "Discoveries." Amphora 79 (March 1990), pp. 8-9.


Fleming, Patricia Lockhart, II A Study of Pre-Confederation Ontario Bookbinding," Papers of the Bibliographical Society of Canada. Xl (1972), 53-70.


Gournay, Isabelle. Ernest Cormier and the Université de Montréal. Montréal: Centre Canadien D' Architecture, 1990.


Gundy, H. Pearson. Book Publishing and Publishers in Canada Before 1900. Toronto: The Bibliographical Society of Canada, 1965.


Hutter, Sidney, Private Communication, The University of Tulsa Library.


McDowell, William T. "A Canadian Bookbinder," The Bookbinding Trades Journal (1914) rpt. in Canadian Book Binders' and Book Artists' Guild. Newsletter. IX, 3 (Autumn, 1991), pp. 6-7.


Parker, George L. The Beginnings of the Book Trade in Canada. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1985.


Six Ontario BookBinders. N.p.: n.p., c.1984.


Art Gallery of Hamilton. 20th Century Bookbinding; An Exhibition at the Art Gallery of Hamilton October 15 to November 21, 1982. Hamilton, Ontario: Art Gallery of Hamilton, 1982.


Spadoni, Carl. "The Dutch Piracy of Gone with the Wind," Papers of the Bibliographical Society of America 84:2 (lune, 1990), pp. 131-150.


St John, Edward S. "The Graphic Publishers Limited, 1925-1932." MA Diss. Carleton University, 1974.


Acknowledgements


The National Library of Canada, for funding. Apollonia Steele: Special Collections, MacKimmie Library, University of Calgary. Len Gottsilig: Glenbow Foundation Library, Calgary. Dana Tenny: Osborne, Lillian H. Smith, and Canadiana Collections, Toronto Public Library. Rosemary Haddad: Biblioteque, Centre Canadien D'Architecture, Montreal. Ann Douglas: Metro Toronto Reference Library. Richard Landon: Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library, University of Toronto.




L'un des premiers arts canadiens du livre: LA RELIURE

Diana Patterson

LES TRAVAUX DE RELIURE s'effectuent depuis le XVIIe siècle dans le territoire maintenant appelé le Canada. Les noms des relieurs, cependant, ne sont pas répertoriés avant la fin du XVIIIe slecle, et ce n'est qu'au milieu du XIXe siècle que nous avons le premier dénombrement des relieurs: le recensement de 1851 fait état de 51 relieurs dans le Haut-Canada, et de 40 dans le Bas-Canada.


Avant 1820, les livres sont généralement reliés en petite quantité, ou sur commande, le plus souvent en cuir. Les décorations sont faites à la main après que les livres sont reliés. Les reliures à la main, et les reliures artistiques présentées dans cette exposition sont toujours faites de cette façon. Après 1820 les éditeurs commencent à relier l'édition complète d'un livre après son impression; les dessins sont imprimes sur papier, ou estampés dans du tissu ou du cuir. La décoration s'effectue surtout à la machine, et une partie de plus en plus grande de la couture et de la fabrication des couvertures commence à être automatlsée. En 1851, la reliure est considérablement automatisée, surtout en ce qui concerne les dessins estampés ou imprimés sur du tissu ou du papier.


A quoi ressemblaient les premières reliures? Il est souvent difficile de le savoir. Nous ne pouvons que supposer que nous avons un exemple des premiers essais de reliure canadienne sur un livre imprimé au Canada, car il n'y a habituellement aucune façon de savoir si un livre imprimé à Paris était, en fait, relié à Montreal. D'après les preuves que nous possédons, les reliures canadiennes montrent un niveau de quatité d'éxecution acceptable, sans être extraordinaire, et les dessins sont principalement copiés à partir de ceux de livres peu coûteux provenant d'Angleterre et de France. Les premières reliures dont l’apparence est purement canadienne semblent avoir été les reliures d'éditeurs de répertoires, de statuts, et d'almanachs du XIXe siècle, dont les couvertures arborent des castors et des feuilles d'érable. 


Des éditeurs anglais commencent à envoyer des livres avec des dessins purement canadiens, dont des feuilles d'érable, des castors, et des Indiens, afin que leurs livres, surtout les livres d'enfants et les manuels, semblent avoir été faits au Canada, alors qu'ils étaient, en fait, imprimés et reliés à Londres. Les imitations de reliures "canadiennes" persistent pendant une bonne partie du XXe siècle. The Chronicles of Canada (32 volumes), publiés pour la première fois en 1915 à Glasgow, ont des couvertures de cuir mince de couleur pourpre, estampées du sceau canadien entouré des mots "Chronicles of Canada." Une dizaine d'années plus tard, le même livre apparaît en tissu rouge, publié par Glasgow, Brook and Company, et imprimé par Hunter-Rose à Toronto. Un sceau semblable, sans être identique, apparaît sur chaque couverture. On peut sup poser que la première édition a été reliée, ainsi qu'imprimée, en Écosse, et la seconde au Canada.


Une certaine partie du travail accompli par les relieurs canadiens, bien que son importance soit inconnue, consiste dans la reliure de livres importés d' Angleterre, de France, ou des États-Unis. Les feuilles de papier imprimées, sans carton, cuir, tissu, et fil de couture, sont moins lourdes que les livres et plus faciles à emballer, ce qui réduit les coûts d'expédition. Les livres sont reliés avant que les ventes au Canada ne débutent.


Un exemple important, bien que relativement modeme, fait l’objet d'une documentation précise parce qu'il met en cause une affaire judiciaire. En 1936 le roman de Margaret Mitchell intitulé Gone with the Wind est imprimé aux États-Unis, et les feuilles envoyées au Canada pour reliure et promotion canadienne. En raison de complications relatives aux droits d'auteur internationaux soumises à la Haute Cour de La Haye, on prétend que les livres sont considérés comme publies au Canada s'ils sont reliés au Canada, et si la promotion s'effectue a partir du Canada. Le tribunal croyait que la publication comprenait l’impression, mais Macmillan du Canada démontre que la reliure de feuilles imprimées ailleurs est une pratique courante au Canada.


L'un des premiers éditeurs à imprimer et à relier des livres canadiens avec des reliures attrayantes au moyen de dessins canadiens est William Briggs de Toronto, qui connaît le succès de 1880 à la fin de la Première Guerre mondiale, moment où son entreprise devient The Ryerson Press. Les reliures d'éditeurs de Briggs sont illustrées, éléqantes et sans aucun doute canadiennes. En 1925, Graphic Publishers d'Ottawa reprend l'idée des dessins canadiens là où Briggs l’a laissée. Graphic Publishers et ses filiales, Ru-Mi-Lou et Ariston, produisent des livres avec des mots, des illustrations, des reliures, des pages de garde, et des jaquettes canadiens, qui rendent un important hommage aux créateurs, comme Thoreau MacDonald. On ne fait nulle part mention des personnes qui ont relié les livres de Briggs ou de Graphic Publishers. Hélas, Graphic Publishers fait faillite en 1932, suite à la Crise de 1929.


Les relieurs canadiens existent depuis longtemps et ont relié des millions de livres, qu'ils soient canadiens ou étrangers, et ils ne font que commencer à être reconnus. L'une des principales raisons est liée à l’anonymat traditionnel du métier: la reliure d'éditeur est un élément complémentaire du processus complet de publication, et seul l'éditeur est habituellement nommé. L'ampleur de leur travail peut difficilement être connue, en raison du qualificatif "provincial" rattaché à bon nombre de pays des empires britannique et français, qui fait que se targuer d'offrir un produit local provoquerait la dérision.


L'art de la reliure à la main refait surface en Angleterre à la fin du XIXe siècle. On réalise des reliures illustrées pour une édition limitée et tres petite d'un ouvrage ou une reliure distinctive pour un exemplaire unique. Au Canada, seul un nombre très restreint de riches collectionneurs réclame un tel travail. Ce n'est qu'à partir du milieu du XXe siècle que la conception artistique de la reliure frappe l’imagination des acheteurs de livres canadiens.


L'un des premiers relieurs artistiques au Canada a sûrement été Thomas C.Lynton d'Ottawa, qui était le relieur de la Bibliothèque du Parlement. L'exemple de son travail qui est illustré dans The Bookbinding Trades Journal de 1914 est celui du livre de Thomas Moore intitulé Irish Melodies qui est "relié en crispé brun avec une harpe mosaïquée en vert et or [;] le bord est mosaïquée en ecarlate, et le cadre intérieur présente un effet très plaisant sur un fond bleu." Si Lynton a créé des dessins "canadiens," et si certains ont survécu au grand feu de 1916, aucun document, à ma connaissance, n'en fait mention.



An especially elaborate binding by Graphic Publishers Limited vanity press, Ru-Mi-Lou. See Edition Bindings. / Une reliure très travaillée par la maison d'édition Ru-Mi-Lou de Graphic Publishers Limited. Voir les reliures d'éditeurs. 

_______________________________________________


L'architecte Ernest Cormier était un relieur plus original, qui a relie plusieurs livres pour lui-même avec des dessins originaux dont l’attrait avant-gardiste persiste. Sa reliure destinee aux Trente arpents de Ringuet (1938) montre le fleuve Saint-Laurent coulant diagonalement sur la couverture, avec les traditionnels fermes en long du Québec, où les maisons de ferme longent les rives du fleuve. Cormier a été formé en France, et sa reliure représente la tradition française, malgré ses sujets tout à fait canadiens.


Cormier n'avait pas de clients pour ses reliures, ni de disciple pour étudier les buts de sa conception des reliures, puisque cela constituait seulement l’un de ses nombreux intérêts pour la conception. Les relieurs artistiques qui arrivent par la suite au Canada viennent de l'Angleterre, de la France, de l'Allemagne, ou d'ailleurs, en apportant leur formation et, du moins au début, leurs sujets traditionnels. Même aujourd'hui, la plus grande part de la reliure artistique est un complément aux éditions imprimées spécialement; on met l'accent sur l'impression et le papier, reléguant la reliure au rôle de boîte pour contenir des feuilles volantes.


Les relieurs continuent de demeurer essentiellement anonymes, au Canada; ce n'est que récemment que des bibliographes ont commencé à décrire des exemplaires individuels plutôt que des exemplaires idéaux de livres imprimés. La documentation d'exemplaires individuels peut s'accompagner d'une description plus complète des reliures, surtout des reliures artistiques. Nous pouvons espérer que des travaux relatifs à l’histoire de la reliure seront effectées afin de donner aux relieurs de talent qui travaillent au Canada une bonne opinion de leur passé.  


Alors que le Canada devrait posséder une tradition de près de 400 ans dans le domaine de la reliure, elle ne fait que commencer. En amenant l'art et la profession de la reliure sur la place publique où les relieurs peuvent observer le travail de chacun, et où le public peut voir la reliure comme une forme d'art, il est possible de créer un sentiment d'appartenance à une tradition. A mesure que vous tournerez les pages du catalogue qui suit, vous verrez des exemples qui marquent l’histoire des arts canadiens du livre, dont L’une des formes d'art les plus anciennes du Canada, soit la reliure.



A binding by Pierre Ouvrard, done in 1987. The text alternates with graphic images of toads, and the binding has been done in accordion fashion so that it is possible to mix the green cloth cover with the black images of the toads. The label on the binding is set into the board and is printed on hand-made paper with green flecks in it (of grass or something that looks like it). See Unique or Limited Edition Bindings. / Une reliure de Pierre Ouvrard, réalisée en 1987. Le texte alterne avec des images graphiques de crapauds, et la reliure est concue comme le soufflet d'un accordéon, pour permettre de combiner la couverture en tissu vert avec les images en noir des crapauds. L'étiquette de la reliure est intégrée au carton et est imptimée sur du papier fabriqué à a main qui incorpore des taches vertes (de gazon ou de que/que chose qui y ressemble). Voir les reiures d'éditions uniques ou limitées.

_______________________________________________


Quelques livres d'interet particulier:


RELIURES D'ÉDITEURS:


Clark, Duncan. The Two Decanters: Written for His Wife by Duncan Clark. Éd. M.[ary] C[oad] Craig. Ottawa: Graphic Publishers Ltd., 1930, 401 p., 19 cm. Reliure noire et or avec une jaquette assortie, illustrant les carafes sous un projecteur.


Fraser, John. A Tale of the Sea and Other Poems, by John Fraser, (Cousin Sandy). lllustré par O.R. Jacobi, H. Sandham, A. Vogt, w.L. Fraser, de la Société des artistes canadiens. Montréal: Dawson Brothers. MDCCCLXX [1870], 87 p., ill., 21 cm. john Lovell, Éditeur. [Le verso de la page titre se lit ainsi:] "Entered according to Act of the Parliament of Canada in the year one thousand eight hundred and seventy, by john Fraser, in the Office of the Minister of Agriculture." Cartons gravés en vert. Plat verso estampé à sec, plat recto doré à la presse. Toutes les tranches dorées à la main. Pages de garde jaune uni, très brillantes.


Fraser, W.A. Mooswa and Others of the Boundaries. lllustré par Arthur Heming. Toronto: William Briggs, MDCCCC. [Le verso de la page titre se lit ainsi:] "Entered according to Act of the Parliament of Canada in the year one thousand nine hundred, by William Briggs, at the Department of Agriculture, Ottawa.” Aucune gravure. Pages de garde blanches, dorure à la presse sur le plat recto et le dos; rien sur le plat verso. Tranche dorée sur la tête seulement.


Grant, George Monro. Picturesque Canada. Toronto: Art Publishing Company, vol. I; Beldon Bros. Vol. II, 18?? 880 p., 500 illus., 33 cm. Relieur canadien: Barber Ellis. Cartons doublés de soie, mosaïqués, gravés. Pour l’histoire de la publication complexe de ce livre, voir Parker, pp. 199-200.


Groves, Edith Lelean. The Kingdom of Childhood avec des décorations par Maude Maclaren. Toronto: Warwick Bros. & Rutter, Limited, 1925, 106 p., ill., 20 cm. Les pages de garde sont assorties à la jaquette. La tranche de tête est droite; aucune dorure; gouttières et tranches de queue coupées grossièrement.


Maclean, J. Flora. True Anecdotes of Pet Animals belonging to our Household for The Christmas Fireside. Toronto: Imprimé par C. Blackett Robinson, 5, rue Jordan, 1882. Tissu grainé de rouge, doré à la presse en noir et or. Plat verso estampé à sec. Cartons biseautés, Toutes les tranches dorées.


Manitoba Pictorial and Biographical De Luxe Supplement. Winnipeg, Vancouver, Montréal: The S.J. Clarke Publishing Co., 1913, 2 volumes, grand in-quarto. Cet ouvrage semble lié au British Columbia Pictorial and Biographical. Ils sont ,tous à demi-reliés en proportions généreuses avec du papier décoré inhabituel (moderne, avec un style oriental), avec des pages de garde assorties, et un mors intérieur en tissu. Mais les volumes sur le Manitoba ont un dentelage prononcé et sont dorés à la main la où le coin et le dos de cuir rejoignent le papier. Maroquin grainé brun; papier jaune verdatre, noir, vert, et rouge. Les volumes sur la Colombie-Britannique sont dateé de 1914, donc moins de soins leur ont été accordés plus tard, mais le même papier et la même peau ont été utilisés.


Mowat, Grace Helen. Funny Fables of Fundy and other poems for Children. Rédigé et illustré par Grace Helen Mowat. Ottawa: Ru-Mi-Lou Books, 1928. "Produced entirely in the Dominion of Canada." Créé en monotype no 38 Goudy; créé, imprimé et relié à Ottawa, par Ru-Mi-Lou Books. Le papier est un papier bible d'édition antique, fabriqué par Provincial Paper Mills, à Mille Roche (Ontario). La reliure est en toile grise, et la dorure à la presse verte.


Osborne, Marian. Flight Commander Stork and other Verses. Illustrations par E.A. Kerr. Toronto: The Macmillan Company of Canada Limited, 1925. 1 vol., ill. (certaines en couleurs), 23 cm. Imprimé au Canada sur la presse de The Hunter-Rose Company Limited. Tissu rouge du genre lin grossier et dorure à la presse. Les pages de garde arborent une illustration créé par E.A. Kerr.


Peterson, C.W. (Charles Walter), 1868-1944. The Fruits of the Earth: a Story of the Canadian Prairies. Ottawa: Ru-Mi-Lou Books, 1928. 304 p., ill., 20 cm. La jaquette montre un fermier qui admire une jeune femme nue (=Mère Nature?) qui surgit de son champ de blé, devant un soleil levant contenant une feuille d'érable. Les pages de garde sont des travaux du genre broderie perlée indienne des Plaines ou broderie en piquants de porc-épic. Reliure en tissu bleu avec dorure à chaud.


Wallis, Ella Bell. The Exquisite Gift. Ottawa: Ariston Publishers Ltd. 1930. 249 p., 19 cm. Il existe des éditions cartonnée et brochée de cet ouvrage, avec une jaquette ou une couverture en papier conçue par Thoreau MacDonald, et ornée d'un "lone-pine design."


Walters, Reginald Eyre. British Columbia: a Centennial Anthology. Toronto: McClelland &: Stewart, 1958. Jolies jaquette et pages de garde arborant une carte de la Colombie-Britannique. Reliure en tissu bleu dont les cartons arborent un symbole des Indiens de la Côte nord-ouest du Pacifique, en noir et or. Le dos est doré à la presse en noir et comprend un dessin travaillé, La page de garde est différente à l'arrière.


REUURES D'ÉDITIONS UNIQUES OU LIMITÉES:


Provenant de la Collection Centre canadien d'architecture / Canadian Centre for Architecture, Montréal


Ringuet, 1895-1960. Trente arpents: roman. Paris: Flammarion, 1938. 292 p.; 18,7 x 13 cm. ID 90-B1433 CORM 26 CAGE. "Il a été tiré de cet ouvrage: quatre-vingts exemplaires sur papier alfa numérotés de 1 à 80. Il a été tiré en outre: deux cent-vingt exemplaires sur papier alfa réservés aux selections Lardanchet numérotés de 81 à 300." Exemplaire 1 de la Bibliothèque: no 3. Ringuet est le pseudonyme de Philippe Panneton. Reliure française de cuir par Ernest Cormier en maroquin anglais brun, estampée a sec et dorée à chaud sur les plats recto et verso, pages de garde marbrées, et tranche de tête marbrée. Les couvertures en papier originales sont intégrées à l’ouvrage. L'exemplaire autographié par l’auteur présenté à Ernest Cormier présents un faux-titre rédigé à la main se lisant ainsi : A Ernest Cormier, à qui rien d'artistique n'est étranger, avec mon amicale estime ... et [?]ion, Ringuet, 25 decembre 1938.


De la  Canadiana, Boys' and Girls' House de la Toronto Public library


Snipper, Nancy. Winter is Here. Snipper Books, aucune date, l0 p., approx. 30 cm. "One of ten." [inscription du rayonnage:] Canadian poetry Snipper. Le livre a la forme d'une épinette de Noël. Les feuilles intérieures sont de centre-plaqué de 1/8 de pouce, les bords extérieurs sont de noyer de 1/2 pouce, et ils sont retenus par des lanières en cuir. Il n'existe aucun renseignement additionnel au sujet de Nancy Snipper ou de ses livres.


De la Collection Evelyn de Mille à l’Universlté de Calgary, MacKimmie library


Bringhurst, Robert, 1946- / Lambert, Lucie, 1947-. Conversations with a Toad: texte, Robert Bringhurst; images, Lucie Lambert. Vancouver: Editions Lucie Lambert, 1987. [24] p., ill., 35 cm. PS 8552 R54 C66 1987. Collections spéciales. No 28 sur 55 exemplaires. Imprimé sur des feuilles doubles, dans la forme traditionnelle orientale, avec des feuilles jointes bout à bout et pliées comme le soufflet d'un accordéon. La reliure a été créé et exécutée par Pierre Ouvrard, de Saint-Paul de l’lie-aux-Noix (Québec). La conception typographique et la composition du caractère, ainsi que l’impression en romain et en romain incliné Romulus, de Jan van Krimpen, sur Kizuki hosho, au moyen d'une presse à bras Albion super royal 1850 de Barbarian Press, Mission (Colombie-Britannique), sont l’oeuvre de Crispin Elsted.


Duciaume, Jean Marcel [et] Francine Gravel, 1944-. Et le verbe s'est fait chair: poemes [par] jean Marcel Duciaume. Gravures [par] Francine Gravel [Edmonton]: Éditions de l'églantier, 1975. [82] p., feuilles repliées (dans un étui), illus., 29,5 x 26 cm. PS .955 4 U2 95E8 1 975 Collections spéciales. No 7 sur 25 exemplaires. Boîte à demi-reliée en veau ocre, et en tissu teint et grainé (artificiellement) en brun, ocre, et de couleur terne. Le fermoir est formé d'une attache de cuir et d'une cheville en bois. Imprimé a l’encre brune. Relié par l’artiste. Doublure gravée encadrée par un tissu tissï renforcé.


De la Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library, Universite de Toronto


Dunlap, David A. Shahwandahgooze Days by David A. Dunlap "Sip-Him-Dew-Dave." Publié privément en 1925. Illus. par Thoreau MacDonald, conçu et relié par Warwick Bros. & Rutter Limited Toronto. La couverture doree a chaud est visiblement l’oeuvre de MacDonald. La page titre est réalisée à l’aide d'une plaque de bois d'une conception différente également de MacDonald.


Holme, Charles, ed. The Art of the Book: A Review of Some Recent European and American Work in Typography, Page Decoration & Binding. Londres, Paris, New York: "The Studio" Ltd. MCMXIV [1914]. Reliure de maroquin avec un dessin doré à chaud de style art nouveau formant un cadre sur le carton du dessus. Dédicace dans cet exemplaire: "To University of Toronto[:] This book is from the Library of the late E.J. Hathaway, one-time chairman of ‘Toronto Public Library Board.’ It is a specimen of fine craftsmanship being bound and hand tooled under his direction by Warwick Bros. & Rutter of which firm he was a Director. Presented by Maud (Snarr) Hathaway (Mrs. E.J.).”


De la Glenbow Foundation Library


de Smet, Father P.J., S.J. Oregon Missions and Travels over the Rocky Mountain in 1845 46, New York: Edward Dunigan, 1847.979.556380 Reliure de Glenbow avec des pages de garde marbrées. Relié vers 1960 ou 1967.


Jacobsen-McGill. Arctic Research Expedition to Axel Heberg Island Queen Elizabeth Island: Preliminary Report 1959-1960. Montréal: McGill, juin 1961.998 J17j. Page de titre imprimée. Mais le reste est une copie dactylographiée accompagnée de similigravures, de cartes et de graphiques. Relié en cuir qrainé de blanc, avec des mosaïques rouges. Le rouge est doré à la main de façon élaborée, les pages de garde séparées par un joint de cuir sont décorées de façon fantaisiste en rouge, avec des chatoiements dorés. Le fourreau est semblable à la reliure sans dorure à la main.


Ross, Alexander. The Fur Hunters of the Far West: A Narrative of Adventures in the Oregon and Rocky Mountains. Vol. II seulement. Londres: Smith, Elder & Co., 1855. 979.5 R823f. Une reliure artistique faite vers 1963 par la fondation Glenbow. Veau or, et dorure a chaud poussee.


Bibliographie


Andrews, Susan. "Discoveries." Amphora 79 (Mars 1990), pp. 8-9.


Fleming, Patricia Lockhart, "A Study of Pre-Confederation Ontario Bookbinding," Documents de la Société bibliographiquedu Canada. XI (1972), pp. 53-70.


Gournay, Isabelle. Ernest Cormier and the Université de Montréal. Montréal: Centre Canadien D' Architecture, 1990.


Gundy, H. Pearson. Book Publishing and Publishers in Canada Before 1900. Toronto: La Société bibliographique du Canada, 1965.


Hutter, Sidney, Communication privée, Bibliothèque de l'Université de Tulsa.


McDowell, William T. "A Canadian Bookbinder" The Bookbinding Trades Journal (1914) réimprimé dans la Newsletter, IX, 3 (Automne 1991) pp. 6-7, de la Canadian Bookbinders and Book Artists Guild.


Parker, George L. The Beginnings of the Book Trade in Canada. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1985.


Six Ontario BookBinders. Aucune place et éditeur, c. 1984.


Art Gallery of Hamilton. 20th Century Bookbinding; An Exhibition at the Art Gallery of Hamilton October 15 to November 21, 1982. Hamilton, Ontario: Art Gallery of Hamilton, 1982.


Spadoni, Carl. "The Dutch Piracy of Gone with the Wind", Papers of the Bibliographical Society of America 84:2 (Juin 1990), 131-150.


St John, Edward S. "The Graphic Publishers Limited, 1925-1932". MA Diss. Université Carleton, 1974.


Remerciements


La Bibliothèque nationale du Canada pour le financement. Apollonia Steele: Collections spéciales, MacKimmie Library, Université de Calgary. Len Gottsilig: Glenbow Foundation Library, Calgary. Dana Tenny: Osborne, Lillian H. Smith, et les Collections Canadiana, Toronto Public Library. Rosemary Haddad: Bibliothèque, Centre canadien d'architecture, Montréal. Ann Douglas: Metro Toronto Reference Library. Richard Landon: Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library, Université de Toronto.




Powered by Wild Apricot Membership Software